Contributions to Books

Over the years I have contributed to a number of books written by my colleagues. Below you will find those writings and links to the books.

View Linda Brady’s Website

“Through the Eyes of a Child” Book Forward

Book forward written for Linda Brady’s book

I have known Linda Brady for over 12 years. She has been my Coach, Teacher, Colleague, Collaborator and Friend. We have shared clients, supporting them through deep transformational work. Linda awakened my Inner Mother and Inner Child, healing the wound that wanted to destroy my vitality. This awakening developed an Embodied Integrated relationship with my Soul. I have used her teachings to support hundreds of clients to find their own Inner Child. I have called this the act of “Re-Mothering” yourself as a way to welcome home your Inner-Child.

As a psychotherapist and life coach, I learned the tools of Internal Family Systems which encourages us to grasp our internal roles or parts of Self. In a therapeutic setting, we invite the curiosity of a client to explore the inner social world of the Self or Ego. Big awakenings happen for those who emotionally connect with the most vulnerable parts of the Self. This has greater impact when we create time and space for concretizing these roles or characters from our inner world. Reading this as a book to gain information will leave you with just that… information. Choosing to do the “work” in an embodied, emotional way, creates a living breathing experience… and THAT, has the capacity to change lives.

Linda Brady has expertly designed an invitation for such a journey. She welcomes the reader to participate in the experience of “Inner Storytelling”. When we work with such themes as our Inner Child or the memory of our Childhood-Self through tangible means, we can meet these personality patterns with less fear since they become more approachable and thus knowable. As Toko-Pa Turner said, “In order to heal the scarcity wound created by the lack of nurturing both in families and in our culture – we must learn to become the loving mother to ourselves that we never had “. Belonging: Remembering Ourselves Home

I invite you to take the action Linda has outlined here. Don’t read it and put it down! That wastes your time. That dishonors your Inner Soul and creates more internal unconscious separation. Instead, dive in, take the leap and do the work! Show up! Be accountable to yourself. Take the risk to be vulnerable and see if your “Authentic Self” has the courage to find, greet, nurture and connect with your Inner Child. This may be the most sacred act you ever choose to do. Are you willing to show up? Are you willing to be kind? Are you willing to take action? Do you want to live an integrated life? Then create sacred space and close your eyes and welcome her/him to the playroom of your heart. Then open up those eyes and walk forward in life as the Integrated Soul that you are meant to become; free, mature, truthful, whole and complete.

Kate P. Appleton, LPC, SEP
Director of Creative Integration Therapy

Getting Unstuck, Practical Guidance for Counselors
Getting Unstuck, Practical Guidance for Counselors
Purchase “Getting Unstuck”

“Getting Unstuck: Practical Guidance for Counselors” by Jon Winder

Interviewed for a chapter of “Getting Unstuck”

“Kate has tremendous insight into play therapy and therapy in general. I was thrilled that she agreed to be interviewed for my book. Her clinical wisdom and experience exemplified the loving, kind spirit of what I hoped my book would convey.” – Jon Winder, LPC, LSA

Overview of “Getting Unstuck: Practical Guidance for Counselors”
A therapist’s worst nightmare is to get caught in the situation of not knowing how to help a client. However, counseling is the art of knowing how to respond to therapeutic situations and dilemmas and not a matter of having all the answers. This accessible and practical book, based on the author’s 40 years of clinical experience, offers counselors from the student to the seasoned therapist ways to respond using over 100 unique strategies, interventions, and examples for overcoming therapeutic dilemmas, such as uncooperative clients, overwhelming problems, and damaged therapeutic relationships. Readers will learn about some of the newest therapeutic discoveries in psychotherapy as well as answers to specific difficulties submitted by other therapists. The reader is challenged to become a co-creator of change with the client opening the doors of self-discovery that turn counseling into an adventure and opportunity for personal growth for both client and counselor. This is an excellent book to use in counselor supervision giving aspiring counselors answers to many perplexing situations.

Kate Appleton contributed to Jon Winder’s book by being interviewed for a chapter on the topic of play therapy and therapy in general.